Interview – Fleur van Dodewaard

 
 
You have been highlighted as an emerging talent by Foam Magazine & recently exhibited at the show ‘There’s Something Happening Here‘, curated by James Reid. What do you feel are the current ‘trends’ within photography & what differentiates something from a ‘trend’ to something more substantial ?

Trends or currents within art are phenomena for curators and editors to deal with. They bring related ideas from different artists together in exhibitions or magazines. What I’m working on is developing my own ideas and visual language. This is a research that is personal and requires a much longer breath than being part of any so-called trend.
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Your work appears to be very visually driven, in the sense that form and colour are the subject and not landscape or personel, where does this attraction stem from ?

Actually, form and color are not the immediate subject of my work. The colorful objects are visual carriers of ideas. They play a role. The work is visually driven in the sense that it often derives from and points at a world of images and art-historical references that are of interest to me. I intent to question what it is you are looking at and what you have been looking at over time. Despite of its formal qualities, I do see my work as a personal view on the world around me.

 

I see your work as something very ‘photographic,’ with perspective a key element, how do you determine what you have within the frame is ‘enough’ for you ?

Although the use of other media like painting and sculpture is an important element in my work; the different qualities of photography speak to my imagination. I try to get the images close to being objects themselves, questioning the status of the photograph as window or depiction of reality and simultaneously celebrate the meta-element of the medium; the eye looking at the subject/object being incorporated in the work. And, like I mentioned before; the image always points at something outside the image. So I don’t feel restricted by the frame in that sense at all.

 
 
 
 

 


What is your relation to graphic design? Does it inform your work to any degree ?

The work has graphic elements, but has nothing to do with design. The images are initiated as autonomous works instead of being in service to anything exterior.

 
 

What role does the photo book play for you in your attraction to photography ? Do you collect a lot of books ?

The photo book is clearly a very specific format to present work. It has its own restrictions and challenges. For me it would be an integral part of the book to reflect upon these issues. I’m actually working on a book project right now in which I’m trying to do so. It will have to be an autonomous thing again, not an overview of works. I surely collect books, but generally I prefer to be able to hold images in my hands or hang them on the wall.

 
 
 

 
 
 
 

When was the last time a new photographer’s work excited you ?

The first thing that comes to my mind is the book/series Sunday by Paul Kooiker. I think that’s a marvelous photographic work. And this weekend I saw an interesting film by Leidy Churchman in which she depicts the creation of a large painting in close-up imagery.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Your latest series / image ‘The Talking Nose’ appears greatly removed from ‘photography’ how do you see your practice developing ?

This image looks a bit different as a small internet-screen-image. Which is the case with most of my works. Printed, you get a lot more sense of materiality. You see scratches, bits of glue, tape, nails, paperfolds. The Talking Nose consists of 4 different exposures and shows a minimal movement within one image. So to me it’s a very photographic work. I always search for ideas and images that surprise me, that appear familiar but unprecedented, lighting up things from a new perspective. A new image always has to shock me a little.

 



 
 
 

Where did your inspiration for the ‘Sun Set Series’ originate?

The sun. Amateur photography. Susan Sontag. Erik Kessels. Ellsworth Kelly. Kazimir Malevich. Bertold Brecht. Walid Raad. Sol Lewitt. Walter Benjamin. Piet Mondriaan. Jan Dibbets. Johannes Schwartz. Paul Kooiker. Marianne Viero. Qiu Yang. Paulien Barbas.